Getting off to a Good Start

Welcome to this week’s vocabulary post.  Last week I read an article about motivation and I saw the phrase ‘get off to a good start’.  This then got me thinking of other forms of the expression.

“As a small business owner, you need to maximize revenue and increase productivity, which means you need your staff to work as efficiently as possible. To get you off to a good start, follow these top ways to motivate your employees.”


Top 5 Ways to Motivate Your Employees (It’s Easier Than You Think) https://www.huffingtonpost.com/margaret-jacoby/top-5-ways-to-motivate-yo_b_5839504.html 

It just seemed like appropriate language for a Monday.  This is  especially true because the phrase can have a few different variations with both productive, and less productive meanings – just like my Mondays often do!

“If you get off to a good start, you are successful in the early stages of doing something. “

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/get-off-to-a-good-bad-start

Variations:

  • get off to a bad start
  • get off to a slow start
  • get of to a steady start

In fact, it seems that you could include many alternative adjectives depending on the message that you want to express.

  • get off to a disastrous start
  • get off to an expensive start
  • get of to a productive start
  • get off to a spectacular start
  • get off to a very sleepy start

So, how has your week began? And, are you just getting off to a last minute start with your Christmas preparations, or did you get off to an early start and have already finished your present shopping and now taking it easy? 🙂 let us know in the comments